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The QRCA Conference: Why I Loved It & Why You Will, Too

Posted By Vidhika Bansal, Monday, February 25, 2019
Updated: Monday, February 25, 2019
Vidhika Bansal is a 2019 QRCA Young Professionals Grant recipient. First launched in 2014, the Young Professionals Grant helps advance promising young qualitative researchers’ careers by providing access to networking and educational sessions via a free pass to the QRCA’s Annual Conference plus a one-year membership. Visit qrca.org/YPG to learn more.

What often makes quallies like us different from the rest of the world is our collective curiosity, empathy, and ability to transform our knowledge of people’s needs and experiences into strategic direction. Given that the QRCA’s Annual Conference is run and attended by quallies, it’s no surprise then that it’s not your average conference.

My week in Savannah at the 2019 Conference, Charting Your Best Course, was jam-packed and enriching in so many ways. As if the delicious Southern food and relaxing river views weren’t enough, here are three reasons why the QRCA Conference stands out in my mind:



Dessert

Dessert following a scrumptious meal at a local Savannah restaurant, seconds before I devoured it



Networking Made Palatable

As consultants, networking is not just an add-on marketing strategy; it’s practically a necessity. Quite unfortunately though, for many—myself included—networking has almost become a dirty word. It tends to conjure up flashbacks of awkward interactions with strangers, insincere exchanges of pleasantries, and general anxiety and dread. Thankfully, the QRCA conference helps change that.

High friendliness quotient: One thing I learned in almost no time is that QRCA folks are among the friendliest you’ll meet. Perhaps it’s because most of us talk and listen to people for a living, but striking up conversations with fellow conference-goers was refreshingly easy and felt far more authentic than I had expected. The various ribbons added to everyone’s name tags made finding common ground and making connections even easier (especially as a first-timer and YPG recipient). And if you’re shy, have no fear—it’ll just be a matter of time before someone approaches you and breaks the ice!

Stress-free socializing: The organizers orchestrated events that further facilitated pain-free networking, especially if you’re a “first-timer” who has never attended before. First-timers are paired with “ambassadors”, who are QRCA conference veterans that can serve as familiar faces and guides throughout (shout out to my wonderful ambassador, Regina!). There was also a “speed dating” event for first-timers where we got to meet with other ambassadors, and as YPG recipients we were able to connect with fellow early/mid-career quallies at the fun, laidback, young-professionals-only breakfast and dinner events.

(Pro-tip: Remember to bring stacks and stacks of business cards with you—you’ll need them to give to all the new people you’ll meet in quick succession as well as for the vendor raffles!)

Conference Badge

My conference badge, adorned with a couple of colorful ribbons that helped break the ice



Stellar, Actionable Content

One of the main goals of attending any conference is usually to leave with takeaways that you can apply to your work immediately—and the sessions at this one definitely did not disappoint.

Insights about insights: There were so many fantastic talks that it’s not practical for me to list them all right now, but these were some of my favorites.

  • Carmen Simon’s very memorable keynote on using learnings from neuroscience to craft content that sticks, especially by relying on familiar mental models
  • Lisa Lipkin’s engaging anecdotes depicting how to best elicit honest stories from others to learn about them, and how to find “magic in the mundane”
  • Allison Rak’s uber-practical hacks for boosting research and reporting efficiency
  • Liz George’s window into using role-play to glean rich insights when ethnographic methods are not an option due to ethical and logistical constraints
  • Laurie Tema-Lyn’s entertaining workshop on improv exercises as a research tool

FOMO no mo’: With so many intriguing sessions going on in parallel (and without a Time-Turner allowing us to be in multiple places at the same time, a la Hermione Granger), it can sometimes be a challenge to choose which presentation to attend. Luckily, starting this year, all presentations were recorded so attendees could go back and watch them even after the conference was over. On top of that, there were “Reporters on the Scene” taking notes during each session, and those curated notes will be published for those who would prefer reading summaries of sessions they missed over watching full videos. Knowing that I would be able to watch the talks I couldn’t attend in-person saved me a ton of indecision.

(Pro-tip that a few kind members shared with me: If you’re struggling to decide between talks, check out the downloadable presentation decks in advance to give you a sense of which one of the alternatives might be most up your alley.)

Something for everyone: There were talks on a vast variety of topics, including proposal writing, storytelling, recruiting methods, journey mapping, projective techniques, usability testing, and even behavioral science. In addition to the breadth of subject matter, I appreciated the mix of formats in which content was shared, ranging from informal roundtable discussions to vendor exhibits to structured presentations of tools and frameworks.


Dinner Group

Being silly at the Young Professionals Dine-Around (Thank you to Shannon Danzy for the photo!)



Finding Your Tribe

Last, but certainly not least, if I had to sum up what makes the QRCA Conference unique, it would be the unmatched sense of community. Cheesy at it sounds, attending the conference felt more like joining a big, happy family than just congregating with a group of like-minded professionals.

Come for the learnings, stay for the people: Valuable content is no doubt important, but the people you meet at the QRCA Conference are just as important, if not more so. Even though technically attendees could view each other as competitors, I noticed that the environment was overwhelmingly collaborative, with knowledge-sharing and camaraderie aplenty. There are even special interest groups (SIGs) to further hone in on people who share your specific interests (for me, it was the Ethnography, Creativity + Ideation, and UX SIGs). With the QRCA, one thing seems to be true: you get as much as you give.

Hugs, not handshakes: “We’re huggers,” I heard someone say on my first day at the conference. I looked around and—lo and behold—it was true. Not only did people greet each other with a genuine excitement to reconnect, but the good vibes weren’t confined to conference hours. Pre-conference mornings began with “healthy connections”, where passionate QRCA volunteers led dance and meditation sessions to get us started for the day. How cool is that?! Similarly, conference evenings ended with group “dine-arounds”, where we got to reclaim the calories worked off in the morning by indulging at local restaurants—a great way to continue conversations, meet new people, and ensure you always had company for dinner. This personal touch is what makes the QRCA such a special organization.

Needless to say, I’m truly grateful and honored to have been a recipient of the QRCA Young Professionals Grant. Without it, I likely would not have attended this year’s conference, and in turn would have missed out on all of these amazing benefits.

Thanks to the generosity of the grant sponsors and dedication of the event organizers, I left Savannah with fresh insights, a renewed view on networking, and even some new friends. Looking forward to next year’s conference in Austin and hope to see you there!


Vidhika Bansal

Vidhika Bansal is a UX strategist with a background in behavioral science, brand marketing, and human-centered design. She’s passionate about using the power of words and people’s stories to make product and service experiences the best that they can be. You can connect with her on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Tags:  QRCA  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Young Professional Grant  Qualitative Research 

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My Experience at the QRCA Conference as a First Timer and Young Professionals Grant Winner

Posted By Sonya Shen, Thursday, February 21, 2019
Updated: Friday, February 15, 2019

Forsyth Park, Savannah, Georgia

Forsyth Park, Savannah, Georgia

Sonya Shen is a 2019 QRCA Young Professionals Grant recipient. First launched in 2014, the Young Professionals Grant helps advance promising young qualitative researchers’ careers by providing access to networking and educational sessions via a free pass to the QRCA’s Annual Conference plus a one-year QRCA membership. Visit qrca.org/YPG to learn more.

Conference Swag

Selected Conference Swag

I won a QRCA Young Professionals Grant to the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, “Charting Your Best Course.” I just returned from spending three packed days in Savannah, Georgia learning from and connecting with other qualitative researchers.

Young Professionals Grant (YPG) Winners Received VIP Service
In October 2018, I learned that I had been awarded a YPG. I had been wanting to focus my career more on qualitative research, and winning the grant was the impetus that I needed to start making my ideas a reality. I immediately felt taken care of: YPG winners received communications leading up to the conference about events geared towards First Time Attendees and Young Professionals. I was also paired up with my own conference ambassador, Susan Sweet of Sweet Insight Group, who helped me prepare for and navigate the conference by sharing tips and introducing me to other attendees. I felt welcomed and prepared even before setting foot in Savannah.

The Conference Schedule Was Packed with Events and Sessions
I recommend planning out which sessions to attend before heading to the conference. The conference app was also helpful in the moment in figuring out where to go next (always a challenge at conferences!). A nice bonus I appreciated is that all sessions are available for viewing after the conference so attendees have less angst about missing a presentation. My FOMO turned to JOMO when I realized I could take a guilt-free break outside to recharge. I treated myself to a walk to Chippewa Square, made famous by the movie Forrest Gump (spoiler alert: there is no bench in the square, it was just there for the movie).

Qually Award Finalist Presentations
The three finalists for the Qually Award presented their proposals and took questions in front of a live and discerning audience. It was clear that a lot of preparation went into the proposals. I was impressed by the amount of camaraderie and openness to sharing that I saw.

Keynote
Dr. Carmen Simon of Memzy delivered a keynote presentation on “The Neuroscience of Memorable Messages”. We learned about memory and the fact that people only remember 90% of what was shared with them after two days. Dr. Simon discussed how to make messages more memorable and how to get people to act on a message (such as if you offer a slight twist, it will bring the brain back to the present).

Sessions
Laurie Tema-Lyn’s session on the topic of “Using Theater Games in Research” demonstrated how to use different techniques to meet a variety of research objectives. I learned how to set the stage so that researchers, respondents, and clients are all comfortable using more out-of-the-box methods such as World Salad, Improv/Role-play, and Theater of Exaggeration. The session allowed me to think creatively, practice my active listening skills, and give myself permission to try new things.

Lisa Lipkin presented on the topic of “Go from Facts to Truth with Neuroscience and Storytelling,” where she encouraged us to “make magic out of the mundane” when we are eliciting stories from respondents. Her tips included seeing the story in everything because what we store in our memories is most meaningful, and everything and everyone has a story. Lisa also encouraged us to dig deeper and be an “emotion detective,” as fact is not truth. Start with the emotion, then hang the facts on it.

Zebra Strategies’ Denene Rodney and Sharon Arthur’s session on “Ensuring Real Diversity in Qualitative Research” examined the role of the researcher as clients’ stewards to educate, guide, and safeguard them, and to better customize marketing messaging that consider cultural nuance. It shared actionable tips of how to ensure personal and collective accountability, accounting for bias, and ethical considerations. I walked away with strategies on how to exemplify this topic by being honest about what I do and don’t know, figuring out how to get answers if I don’t know something, expanding my network, developing empathy and curiosity, and to not run and to not hide.

“Opening Closed Doors with Role-Play” by Elizabeth George of Market Strategies was a deep dive into how to use role-play in research. While ethnography is the gold standard, barriers abound, such as in doctor/patient interactions. Liz walked us through the logistics of a particular type of role-play in which doctors are the respondents, actors are hired to play the patients who interact with the doctors, and the researchers are the facilitators. There was a great deal of information, and I felt like I was equipped to implement this strategy if I wanted to.

Networking Was Plentiful
I highly recommend attending a conference where most attendees are great at asking questions and where organizers are skilled at facilitating experiences. This conference checked both boxes. There were plenty of opportunities to meet other attendees and connect over shared interests. Highlights Include:

  • The First Timers Event: This was set up like a speed dating event where First Timers meet non-First Timer attendees. All the fun with none of the awkward rejection!
  • The Young Professionals Dine-Around Dinner: I connected with other Young Professionals at a restaurant in downtown Savannah. Topics of discussion were varied – from career to food, to kangaroos (friend or foe?).
  • Thursday Night Event at Kevin Barry’s Irish Pub: A giant get-together for everyone at the conference which included First Timers Bingo (Tip: maximize your time in the food line by asking passers-by if they can help you cross off a bingo square).
  • The Young Professional Exchange: Career and Life Hacks to Supercharge Your Growth (Roundtable): Young Professionals convened to discuss solutions to problems they commonly face. One of the many takeaways I left with was to lean into what sets me apart as a researcher.
  • Optional Chapter Meetings: I got the opportunity to meet other qualitative researchers in my area over breakfast.

As a First Timer, I felt completely at ease while networking. The conference size was manageable, and it felt heartening to see that so many other attendees knew each other and were catching up.

There are Many Opportunities to Stay Involved After the Conference
As a winner of the YPG, I was also awarded a one-year QRCA membership. I am already signed up to attend the next SF QRCA Chapter Meeting and plan on volunteering in some capacity. There are many opportunities to stay plugged in through the QRCA forum, through a SIG (Special Interest Group), or with a committee.

Bonus “Wow” Moment: Doing chair yoga with a view overlooking the Savannah River.

The 2019 QRCA Conference was a wonderful learning and networking experience. Thank You to the QRCA and Young Professionals organization for organizing the conference and awarding me a YPG. Hope to see you next year in Austin!

Sonya ShenSonya Shen, Independent Research Consultant

Sonya is a Researcher, Storyteller, and Yoga Teacher located in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Tags:  QRCA  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Young Professional Grant  Qualitative Research 

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The AQR/QRCA Worldwide Conference: Experiences & Learnings from a First-Timer

Posted By Shannon Danzy, danzy consults., Tuesday, June 19, 2018

This post was written by Jessica Fennell, a 2018 QRCA Young Professionals Grant recipient. Jessica works at Northstar Research Partners. First launched in 2014, the Young Professionals Grant recognizes promising qualitative researchers aged 35 and younger with free passes to the QRCA’s Annual Conference. The application deadline to attend January’s 2019 QRCA Annual Conference: Charting Your Best Course in Savannah, GA is September 24. Visit qrca.org/YPG to learn more.

As a lucky recipient of the QRCA’s Young Professionals Grant, I was extremely pleased to hear that the theme for this year’s Worldwide Conference was ‘Stay Curious’. This topic felt like it had a wide scope and, for me personally, harked back to the reason I first entered qualitative research — pure curiosity about people.

What to Expect

This was also my first international conference and I flew to Spain with a very open mindset on what I would discover over two-and-a-half jam-packed days. So, what can you expect when you attend your first AQR/QRCA Worldwide Conference?

Collaboration and Open Dialogues
One thing that immediately struck me about the Worldwide Conference was the level of collaboration among attendees. This was the first conference I had been to that specifically focused on agency-side researchers attending rather than clients. Perhaps it was this, coupled with an excellent structure (which allowed for ample opportunities to meet other attendees), that fostered a general culture of openness. I found myself networking with a whole range of practitioners, sharing our experiences on how we design our projects and swapping inspiration.

Networking Made Easy
Ah, networking! I will freely admit that walking into a roomful of 100 complete strangers with the aim of making contacts is not something that has ever filled me with joy. However, as a first-timer, the reception I was given by AQR and QRCA made it easy to start conversations. For other conference first-timers, I would highly recommend stepping off the networking cliff and just giving it a go. Bring stacks of business cards and be prepared to start sharing your ideas and research practices with others. Do so and you’ll get so much back in return.

The Findings

But what about the presentations themselves? They provided a myriad of different interpretations of the conference theme ‘Stay Curious’. Standout presentations came from qual-at-scale platform Remesh and Acacia Avenue (both of which won the Sabena McLean Best Presentation Award). The speakers demonstrated a variety of approaches to the topic. These ranged from practical tips which I could see being implemented in my own research straight away, to more thought-provoking ideas and concepts.

Here are some of the standout ideas for me:

Borrowing from Surrounding Disciplines
Some of the most thought-provoking research ideas and approaches were borrowed from different disciplines. This is particularly true with regards to the communication and presentation of research ideas. Relish Research shared inspiring and practical tips about the principles of Method Acting. The technique, used by actors as diverse as Daniel Day-Lewis to James Dean, relies on the practitioner ‘becoming’ a character and completely immersing themselves in their emotions. Relish showed how adapting this method for research purposes could be used to bring clients closer to their audiences. First by setting clients a brief with the characteristics and practical limitations of their audience (budget, childcare etc.), they could be briefed to do anything from role play scenarios in workshops or shopping as their customer. The real benefit of this approach is that your clients can discover their own insights by becoming their target customer.

Prioritise Culture
Alex Gordon from Sign Salad called for cultural understanding to hold a more central role in research. To borrow the words of the writer Toni Morrison, the job of a culture expert is: “to familiarize the strange and mystify the familiar." Culturally driven brand thinking allows researchers to identify and interpret where it will sit in the changing cultural future. Gordon highlighted Grant McCracken’s book, Chief Culture Officer, which calls for big organisations to create a position for a "person who knows culture, both its fads and fashions, and its deep, enduring structures."

Roben Allong at Lightbeam Communications highlighted how cultural bias or blindness towards questions of identity and culture need to be addressed by researchers as a matter of urgency. Cases like H&M’s Monkey sweatshirt PR disaster show how cultural blindness can have serious implications for both brand trust and profits. As researchers, we should always be considering the context and background of our interactions and analysis. For example, in the increasingly important new language of emojis, the Princess icon has a completely different meaning to African American women vs. Caucasian women. This is important because it is a qualitative researcher’s task to gain an intimate understanding of the target audience’s culture and language trends. Becoming culturally literate is of vital importance if we are to truly help our clients.

Thinking Critically about Your Biases
The age-old problem of avoiding bias in our fieldwork through the ‘research effect’ is still prevalent. In South Africa, Lesley Croskery of In Focus Qualitative Research talked about the potential negative implications of observing or moderating as a white researcher in black households. She advised being constantly aware of the effect your presence has on fieldwork. This could be as simple as minimising the number of observing clients to properly managing expectations about the research with participants. There are also extra considerations in a bilingual country like South Africa. Appraise not just whether conducting fieldwork in English will make research easier but whether moderating in the language they use at home would make participants feel more comfortable and open to discussion.

Both in the structure of the conference and the range of topics covered, my experience in Valencia truly embodied the topic of Stay Curious. Come with an open mind and prepared to be inspired!

Visit qrca.org/YPG to learn more about the Young Professionals Grant.

Tags:  AQR  QRCA  QRCA Young Professional Grant  qualitative research  Worldwide Conference on Qualitative Research 

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Change is the New Normal: Insights from the 2018 QRCA Conference

Posted By Kathleen Doyle, Doyle Research Associates, Inc, Thursday, February 8, 2018

If you are a qualitative researcher and have not attended a QRCA Conference, you owe it to yourself to add it to your list. QRCA members are hands-down the most generous, forward-thinking and collegial people you will ever meet, and the conference itself is unlike any other.

As usual, this year’s conference was full of educational and inspirational sessions, great exhibitors, and some excellent and thought-provoking roundtable discussions.

Here is a recap of my key takeaways:

  1. Social media and AI technology are rapidly becoming the next generation tool for qualitative recruiting and data collection. Shapiro & Raj discussed their social adaptive recruiting, which accesses forums, online communities, and public social networks to “find the hard-to-find”; and Tory Gentes discussed some decidedly non-traditional techniques for using tools in our socially connected world (some sites this Boomer had never heard of before!) as a means to find quality recruits.
  2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are poised to explode as a qualitative tool. David Bauer, of Hemisphere Insights, led a great session on this topic. As home VR equipment becomes ubiquitous, and programming costs are reduced, the ability to create more engaging experiences will become a reality. Use VR/AR to test concepts in-home; to simulate an in-store shopping experience; to create truly engaging virtual ethnography; to facilitate co-creation; and to allow stakeholders to understand the customer experience in a way not possible before.
  3. The traditional qualitative report is slowly but surely going the way of the dinosaur. The momentum continues to grow for shorter, more visual, non-traditional reports that tell a story that can persuade and influence decision making. While PPT is still most common, reports may also take the form of podcasts, photo books, full video reports, magazine reports, talk shows, or any number of other creative deliverables.
  4. The line between qualitative and quantitative is continuing to blur. Any survey can now be combined with qualitative feedback via video open-ends or qualitative “pull outs” — where a select number of respondents (based on their survey responses) are asked to participate in follow up qualitative interviews, to expand upon the learning from the survey and address the “why’s” behind their responses. Where once qualitative and quantitative were distinctly different beasts, hybrid projects are becoming increasingly common.

It’s an exciting time to be in the market research industry. Hold on, and enjoy the ride!

“This is a new year. A new beginning. And things will change.”

― Taylor Swift

“The pace of change and the threat of disruption creates tremendous opportunities…”

― Steve Case

Sign up today for the 2019 QRCA conference.

Tags:  conference recap  QRCA  QRCA Annual Conference  qualitative market research  qualitative research 

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Under 35? Applying for a Young Professional Grant Is a Must

Posted By Elizabeth Marconi, Catapult Marketing Group, LLC, Wednesday, October 4, 2017
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Applications are now open for the Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) Young Professionals Grant (YPG). Fifteen grants will be awarded to young professional qualitative researchers 35 years and younger to attend the QRCA’s 2018 Annual Conference: Elevate & Cultivate, to be held January 24-26 in Phoenix, AZ, a USD $1,300 value, funded by partners Schlesinger Associates, M/A/R/C Research and FocusVision.

Receiving the QRCA’s Young Professionals Grant was a distinct honor that came at the perfect time in my career. I had been working for four years at a large marketing research supplier and had been seriously considering joining my mother’s small qualitative consulting firm. At the 2015 conference in Orlando, I was able to speak with other independent consultants who offered encouragement and concrete advice. I also met a number of other parent-child MR pairings that really made me feel like part of a well-worn tradition. I made the career transition soon after the conference and haven’t looked back.

From the first activity – the “speed dating” between first-timers and mentors – I felt energized by the collective enthusiasm and vitality that filled the grand hall. Everyone was eager to learn about my background, interests and career goals – not surprising given that qualitative researchers are a naturally inquisitive breed. It was immediately apparent that QRCA members are genuinely vested in everyone’s professional success and personal happiness.

The sessions at the conference struck the perfect balance for me between practical and theoretical subject areas. As a former academic nerd in college, I appreciated the high-level presentations on more abstract topics like consumer behavior. In addition, the numerous sessions on everyday tips and tricks helped me leave with a significantly expanded market research toolkit.

I officially joined QRCA after the conference and have enjoyed deepening my involvement with the national group and my local Philadelphia chapter. The leadership team at the conference made it clear that there is opportunity for any member to actively contribute to QRCA, regardless of experience level. During my first year in QRCA, I contributed to VIEWS magazine and participated in the YPG committee. Over the past year, I became Treasurer of the Philly chapter, co-chair of the Membership Committee and participated in both the Conference and Young Professionals Committees.

I highly recommend that young professionals take advantage of this unique program. You will assuredly come away with a few new connections and a renewed excitement for qualitative research.

Visit qrca.org/YPG to apply or learn more.  Applications are due November 1, 2017.

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Tags:  QRCA  QRCA Young Professionals Grant  qualitative research 

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What Made American Audiences Cry over a Coffee Ad?

Posted By Kay Correy Aubrey, Wednesday, May 31, 2017
What Made American Audiences Cry over a Coffee Ad?

An Interview with Dr. Clotaire Rapaille on the Culture Code

Dr. G Clotaire RapailleDr. G Clotaire Rapaille is a cultural anthropologist and founder of Archetype Discoveries Worldwide. He is best known for writing the New York Times bestseller The Culture Code: An Ingenious Way to Understand Why People Around the World Live and Buy as They Do. QRCA member Kay Correy Aubrey interviewed Dr. Rapaille for our VIEWS magazine. The first part of the interview appeared in the Spring 2017 issue of VIEWS.

Dr. Rapaille explains that in humans, our reptilian brain always wins. “The reptilian (brain) is about basic survival, basic instinct. It’s short-term. It’s pain and pleasure. It’s so strong.”

That deeply embedded, instinctive feeling is what the Culture Code is all about. “There is no learning about anything without emotion,” Dr. Rapaille says. “The more intense the emotion, the stronger the imprint…. When you learn a word, you learn more than the word — the whole culture goes with it. It’s a package. You get so much with a word.”

Using this as a starting point, Dr. Rapaille and his associates take groups of people from a particular culture to do imprinting sessions. Going through that process with Americans in a project for Folgers coffee, the team discovered that Americans imprint on the aroma of coffee. “And what we said at the time is that Folgers should own the aroma, everything. And then we designed communication around aroma.”

In the resulting ad, a young soldier returns home from the military and makes coffee for his sleeping mother. She smells the coffee, realizes what it means, and rushes down the stairs to hug her son. “When we tested the commercial people were crying,” Dr. Rapaille says. “It’s not just coffee. It’s reactivating the first imprint of something that is so emotionally positive and associated with all the reference systems. So we discover these dimensions that are so powerful, but usually unconscious.”

Tags:  american audiences  clotaire rapaille  cry over coffee ad  culture code  kay correy aubrey  qrca  spring 2017  views magazine 

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QRCA Announces Annual Award Recipients for 2017

Posted By Conference Team, Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Qualitative Research Consultants Association (QRCA) recently announced the recipients of its association awards, which were given out at the organization’s annual conference in Los Angeles, held in mid-January.

Global Outreach ScholarshipOana Rengle, Bucharest, Romania

Introduced in 2008, the Global Outreach Scholarship is awarded annually to qualitative researchers from outside the US, UK or Canada. Because international qualitative researchers may not have high-quality professional development opportunities within their own countries, QRCA offers winners the opportunity to experience first-hand QRCA’s Annual Conference with its unique culture of learning and sharing. The 2017 winner, Oana Rengle runs her own qualitative consultancy, Anamnesis, in Bucharest. Oana is a force of nature with a larger-than-life personality. She is a driven investigator of all things qualitative. Oana explores, compares, and shares whatever she learns about methodologies and how to make them work for clients, transcending international borders.

Maryanne Pflug Spirit AwardSusan Sweet, Sweet Insight Group, Lafayette, Colo.

The Maryanne Pflug Spirit Award upholds and celebrates QRCA’s cultural heritage of collegiality among members and commitment to the organization, and is awarded to a member who demonstrates “spirit” in the association. The recipient is selected by a committee of former recipients, from candidates nominated by members. Susan Sweet is a former board member, committee leader and leader in planning the worldwide conference. Among the statements made by nominators, “When the association tries to settle into status quo, she pushes for fresh, young energy. When a committee starts to slog, she gives it life. She embodies Maryanne's qualities of friendliness, passion, and unconditional positive regard for all.  Her enthusiasm and passion are infectious.”

President's AwardLynn Greenberg, Lynn Greenberg Associates, Hastings on Hudson, N.Y.

This award is given for exemplary service and dedication to QRCA to a volunteer member who is not on the board of directors. It recognizes contributions within the past year and/or during a career/lifetime of work. The recipient is chosen by the board and the award is presented by the president at the annual conference. Lynn Greenberg is a past president, was the first annual conference chair, and remains an active committee leader. Some of the things said of Lynn by nominators included, “She's an Olympic-class collaborator. She is a dynamo… Lynn is an inspiration who constantly keeps growing, learning, re-inventing. She keeps it fresh and real. She’s a powerhouse of energy.”

Qually Award – Tory Gentes, The Palmerston Group, Lebanon, N.H.

The QRCA Qualitative Excellence Award is the premiere award in the industry and is awarded annually to a practitioner or practitioners who exhibit a mastery of knowledge of qualitative methodology and thinking. In the past this award was presented for a previously executed project; however, this year the award was based on the best response to an RFP for a hypothetical client. Submissions were made by QRCA members and voted on by QRCA members. Tory Gentes was recognized for her creative and innovative proposal addressing transportation challenges in California and received a prize of $1,000 USD and a trophy.

Rising Star AwardAnya Zadrozny, AnyaZMedia, New York, N.Y.

Introduced in 2009, this award recognizes QRCA’s newer, younger members for their leadership and significant contribution to QRCA. The recipient is chosen by the board, from candidates nominated by members. Anya Zadrozny is a past Young Professional Grant winner and active marketing committee member. In presenting the award to Anya, QRCA president Manny Schrager noted her achievements, including a significant contribution to several committees, “Anya is super talented and an ‘overachiever’ for QRCA, including producing a video that communicated the new QRCA brand position and coordinating videos that will be used to promote QRCA in the future.”

Tags:  2017 award winners  maryanne pflug award  presidents award  qrca  qually award  rising star award 

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Why you should join our special interest groups

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 9, 2016
QRCA Special Interest Groups

QRCA members can join Special Interest Groups (SIGs) that focus on specific qualitative research disciplines. For example, The Social Media Research SIG (SMR SIG) helps QRCA members expand their skills in this new and rapidly changing field. Specific direction of the group will be determined by the members’ interests and skill sets. Potential subject areas include new social media listening platforms, listening case studies, expanding qualitative social media engagement practices, and more.

Learn about other QRCA member benefits here.

Tags:  leadership  qrca  qualitative interest  sigs  special interest groups 

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Our experts will show you how to create actionable insights in our upcoming QCast

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 9, 2016
october 2016 qcast

Join us for the upcoming Qcast: Understanding Critical Tipping Points by Going Deeper Faster: Leveraging Mixed Methods, Digital/Online Technology and Innovative Projectives

This Qcast will be held on Thursday, October 6, 2016 at noon EDT.

Four independent QRCA professional research colleagues with extensive health care experience joined together to conduct an exciting research case study. By extensively layering projectives into both telephone and online methodologies, they demonstrate how they expedited rich, compelling and actionable strategic insights. They illustrate how "tipping points" evolved while physician-patient conversations and patient journeys truly came alive!

» Get more information and register now

» Also, take a look at some past Qcasts here

Tags:  actionable insights  critical tipping points  digital technology  october 2016  online technology  qcast  qrca 

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Calling Intl Friends – We’ve got a scholarship opportunity for you!

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 3, 2016
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global outreach scholarship award 2016QRCA recognizes it’s not always a level playing field out there. International qualitative researchers may not have the opportunities within their own countries for professional and personal development they’d ideally like to have.

Each year, through the QRCA Global Outreach Scholarship, one international qualitative researcher is offered the opportunity to experience first-hand QRCA’s unique culture of learning and sharing which facilitates continuing personal and professional development.

The winner will receive free conference registration, up to $1,000 for travel costs, and free membership through 2017.

Please share this information about this opportunity with international colleagues and encourage them to apply by the September 2 deadline!

Read more and apply here.

Tags:  2017 annual conference  application  conference  global  global outreach scholarship  international  outreach  qrca  scholarship 

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