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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits

Posted By Anya Zadrozny, Thursday, June 13, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits

Kayte Hamilton’s session Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits focused on the current trends in proposal writing. As the co-chair of the QRCA Qually Award (which is an award given to the researcher that submits the best proposal to a set RFP) Kayte has had the unique experience of peaking behind the curtain and checking out what today’s proposals look like. With that knowledge along with interviews she conducted with fellow researchers, she took attendees through ways they could update and refresh their proposal writing, content and presentation to win more business.

Before we get to the meaty slide – here are two tips to remember before you start creating your proposal.

  1. View your proposal as the first expression of your company and brand identity. Make sure your brand personality and style shine through.
  2. When you receive an RFP, ask questions to the potential client about the target audience, budget, timing to return proposal, etc. Worst case – you don’t get a response, best case – you form a connection with the potential client and stand out from the crowd.
  3. Get feedback. Set reminders when you send in proposals to send a follow-up e-mail in a week to check the status of the proposal. Set another Email reminder to get feedback on why you did or did not get the job. Remember to use that proposal feedback to update your next proposal.

Here are five main trends from Kayte’s presentation that are helpful for you to know, and research further, as you go forth and submit proposals.

  • Brevity
    • The trending length of your proposal should be around 8 pages or slides. That’s 1 cover + 7 supporting pages and it should be sent in PDF format.
    • Be aware and find a balance between articulation and over-explanation.
    • As moderators we are great at mirroring and use it to our advantage, however - mirroring is not helpful here – don’t waste space copying proposal wording or creating a long run up to your design – the clients know what they asked. Answer the question, don’t pose it again.
    • The KISS method – aka keep it simple stupid – is the best way to present your ideas. Clients are often opening proposals on their phones or checking out proposals during small breaks during the day. Present them with something they are not going to dread or be intimidated to read.
  • Design
    • Your proposal should be presented in a visually appealing way, it should add to the streamlined, clean feeling of the content.
    • How do you get to design? After digesting the RFP, start with an outline of what you want to cover, then get into the heavy, meaty writing, then edit and trim that brain dump to get the executive summary level of the content, and finally add that text into your design.
    • Don’t have a proposal template? Piggyback off of your report template, or search for free proposal designs in Google with a few keywords and go from there. Don’t discount hiring a professional here. This is often the first impression of your brand.
    • Terrified of going from word to PPT? Try turning your word page from portrait to landscape and give that a try.
  • Multi-Phase Research
    • This is more of a research trend than a proposal style trend – but Kayte found that multi-phase research is in! If this isn’t something you are already doing, she suggested a few ways to implement multi-phase research, without it being a giant undertaking.
      • Integrate the pre-research you are already doing as the first phase into your proposal.
      • Utilize the same respondents or a select few respondents from part one into part 2 to save on recruiting costs. For example, a mobile board to focus groups.
  • Collaboration
    • We are facilitators, we juggle various stakeholders and agendas. Why not officially involve these stakeholders in your research phases? From a debrief session at the end, to a mini working session or co-creation session between phase 1 and phase 2 or a facilitated findings co-creation exercise before report writing - getting stakeholder involvement and awareness during the whole research process can be time-saving and beneficial.
    • Adding research phases where your client can observe the participant in the real world was also suggested.
  • Social
    • Using Social media is trending.
    • Monitoring and scanning online reviews, videos, comments and forums to assess the topic.
    • Using social media research as the first phase or pre-research information as pre-research and a dose of reality.
    • Check what awareness there is from your client of their customers opinions of their brand via their social media presence.

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Anya Zadrozny

AnyaZMedia

Twitter: @Anyazmedia

 

Tags:  proposals  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data

Posted By Randi Stillman, Thursday, June 6, 2019
Updated: Monday, June 3, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data

UX Live!

Summary:
At the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Caroline Volpe, Compass Market Research LLC and Maria Virobik, ResearchScribe, presented on the “Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data”. Through their hands-on presentation, the presenting team shared inspiration, ideas, and tools to communicate research data in text-based reports by the creative use of visual elements to tell a story with all in attendance.

Key Takeaways:
QRCs can apply a few simple guidelines and have access to free or low-cost online tools if they want to transform the bulleted text of a traditional PPT report into a visually compelling story. The presenters recommend creating a desktop inspiration folder to save icons, vector graphics (for infographics), images, and report formats, such as the methodology section for depicting the who, what, when, where, and how of your project. Don't forget to use built-in visual design elements, such as size, color, spacing, etc. for clarity, direction, and importance when you put your report together to tell a story. Some of the resources mentioned include: The Noun Project, Flat Icon, Free Pick, CanStockPhoto, 123RF, Slideshop, SmartArt, and Inkscape.

Putting it into practice:
I will continue to think visually as a storyteller when doing my own reports and I'll explore some of the resources mentioned for inspiration and new ideas. 

A-ha moment:
For best results, allow yourself some time to explore and be playful when getting ideas and searching images that will help you tell a compelling story.

Kayte HamiltonQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Randi Stillman
Bottom Line Market Research & Consulting
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randistillman/
Twitter: @bottomlinemrv

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Opening Closed Doors with Role Play

Posted By Vidhika Bansal, Thursday, May 30, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 20, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Opening Closed Doors with Role Play

Summary:

Although immersive ethnographic research is the gold standard for gathering real-world insights, there are situations when financial, regulatory, logistical, privacy, and ethical constraints make such contextual research extremely challenging, if not altogether unfeasible. Luckily, as Elizabeth George shared with attendees at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, role play is a fantastic alternative research method that can allow us to learn a lot about the nuanced conversations that occur “behind closed doors”.

By pairing a respondent immersed in a scenario with an actor who engages with the respondent to simulate a real-world situation, we can begin to better understand the natural language used and interactions characteristic of dialogue around a given product or topic. We can also gain deeper insight into the dynamics of complex decision-making, such as how potential customers may react to two different sales pitches. These insights are especially helpful in developing messaging strategy, educational content that addresses gaps in awareness, as well as gauging receptiveness to specific ideas or approaches.

 

Key Takeaways:

  • When to use it: Role play research can be especially helpful when attempting to glean nuanced information from stakeholders in industries that are highly-regulated, prohibitively-costly, or ethically-challenging.
  • The process: There are several steps to the process of conducting role play research, namely: identifying the research objectives and scenario of interest, determining appropriate roles and recruiting actors for them, creating profiles and guidance for your actors and respondents, “setting the scene” for respondents and observing interactions play out, and finally debriefing both parties.
  • Valuable outcomes: Content and messaging strategy development is often a key outcome of such research, along with a better understanding of receptiveness (or lack thereof) to certain products or approaches.

 

Putting it into practice:

The next time I work with a client in the financial or healthcare space or am struggling to get “behind a closed door” of any sort for immersive research, I will keep this invaluable tool in my back pocket as a high-quality alternative approach.

 

A-ha moments:

  • Especially in salesperson-prospect and physician-patient scenarios, respondents often are able to act relatively natural despite being in a simulated setting with an actor because they tend to be accustomed to using role play when they are first being trained.
  • Using the physical space to your advantage, by walking the respondent over to the actor (and conducting setup and debriefs in a different space), can help limit the influence of the environment being simulated vs. real for the respondent.
  • Role play research can be a fantastic way to validate personas that you have already created, especially if they were proto-personas largely based on assumptions.

Liz was an absolutely fantastic presenter—engaging, knowledgeable, and able to explain her process in digestible and relatable terms—and this research method is a great one to add to our expanding toolkit.

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Vidhika Bansal

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vidhikabansal/

Twitter: @Vidhster

 

Tags:  qrca  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research  Research Methodologies 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Neuroscience of Memorable Messages

Posted By Graciela Braniff, Thursday, May 23, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 13, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Neuroscience of Memorable Messages

Summary:

Dr. Carmen Simon presented during the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference on strategies for transforming yourself and your message into something worth noticing and remembering. According to Dr. Simon, one of the biggest problems with business content is that audiences forget 90% of what you share after two days. To help us understand how people pay attention, remember content, and ultimately act on it, we need to look at the field of neuroscience, which reveals insights on how the brain processes information and tends to remember it – or, more often – forget it.  Throughout her session, Dr. Simon taught us how to convert neuroscience insights into practical guidelines you can use to craft content with lasting impact. This is critical because both your internal and external audiences make decisions in your favor based on what they remember, not on what they forget.

 

Key Takeaways:

This was the most interesting presentation regarding neuroscience that I have heard in a long time. Instead of a explaining how neuroscience can help to analyze concepts and advertising and discover how emotionally interesting or engaging they are (which from what I have read is not possible) Dr. Simon explained what can help make our presentations and our reports more memorable in our spectators’ minds.

One remembers only maybe 10% of what is presented. So, it is extremely important that there is one main idea that unifies the whole presentation. It must be clear, and it has to convey a reward to the spectator. This idea must engage on mental models (existing associations) that the spectator knows because this helps them perceive it rapidly. In the presentation there has to be a balance between what is new and what is a mental model, so twist the familiar with what is new to consolidate memorability. These ideas can also be applied to the messages that our clients want to convey

 

Putting it into practice:

After hearing Dr. Simon’s presentation, I took the opportunity to renew my company's presentation and reports I had done to help them be more memorable!

 

A-ha moment:

There was a moment during the presentation that I realized how much something Dr. Simon presented resonated: “An idea that moves and motivates me thoroughly, will also move and motivate others.” It seems simple, but it really stuck with me. I even used the presentation information to redo two important upcoming presentations based on this information.

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Graciela Braniff

Braniff Qualitative

 

 

 

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative Research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Better AND Faster? It can be Done!

Posted By Peggy Moulton-Abbott, Thursday, May 16, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 13, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Better AND Faster? It can be Done!

Summary:

In the dynamic, fast-paced environment in which we all operate, innovation is crucial. During the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Allison Rak of Vatoca Partners presented practical methods to take our businesses and offerings to the next level. Allison gave us Quallies so many methods to lighten our work loads and speed up our outputs including a method for report writing that will literally cut days off of your turnaround time, while taking your deliverables up a notch!

Key Takeaways:

Follow these steps:

  1. List everything you do in the course of your work.
  2. Identify tasks you love.
  3. Identify tasks ONLY you can do.
  4. Find someone to whom you can outsource everything else.
  5. Build the costs into your overall budget and do not break it out to the client.

There are many great, efficient and inexpensive resources are available to help us with our work, we need to tap into these resources!

 

Putting it into practice:

It’s a great self-examination exercise to identify everything we’re doing and concentrate on outsourcing the time/labor intensive tasks we could pay someone else to do so we can concentrate on what we love to do.

A-ha moment:

There are so many sites and apps that can provide qualified people to do our drudge work and even assist our clients with theirs. Everyone should look and listen to this sage advice!

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Peggy Moulton-Abbott

Newfound Insights

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/peggymaatnewfoundinsights/

 

 

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: What Qual Can Learn from Coaching

Posted By Meghan Lazier, Thursday, May 9, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: What Qual Can Learn from Coaching

Summary:

In this session at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Jay Zaltzman of Bureau West talked about his experience and training as a coach to demonstrate how coaching can provide a new perspective for qualitative work.

Coaching has gained in popularity in recent years. Coaches used to only be hired by athletes and other performers who wanted to go beyond average to excellent, but many have realized they don’t have to be performers to benefit from coaching and become more effective. Qualitative researchers can use coaching principles to stand out and provide even more value to clients.

Key Takeaways:

As a qualitative practitioner, you already have skills that the coaching profession values, according to Zaltzman. You're comfortable speaking, you can listen without judgment and you know not to interrupt or impose your own point of view. Coaches are very good at helping clients look at issues in their own lives through different perspectives, and if quallies can bring multiple perspectives to their work, they will provide a lot of value in a lot less time. 

 

Putting it into practice:

Having worked with a coach previously, I know that many coaches do initial exercises with their clients to help them clarify their values. Jay recommended starting with clarifying values to help inform various parts of qualitative research, including creating a discussion guide and further probing the values of the brand using a similar approach.

 

A-ha moment:

The best coaches know how to ask great questions. Jay introduced us to what he calls the miracle question during his session:

Imagine you go to bed tonight and sometime in the middle of the night, while you are sleeping, a miracle happens and the challenge that we are discussing is resolved. When you wake up in the morning, what’s the first small sign you’d see that would make you think, “Well, something must have happened” the problem is gone! When was the last time you saw a little bit of the miracle, even just for a short time?

Not only is this a useful question personally, but it's a question that delves into the heart of Zaltzman's belief that taking on a coaching attitude and asking better questions can help you go deeper and gain more insights for your clients.

If you're interested in more resources on coaching, Jay recommends checking out Co-Active Coaching textbooks or the work of Steve Chandler.

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Meghan Lazier

https://www.meghanlazier.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/meghanlazier

Twitter: @meglaz

 

Tags:  Coaching  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative Research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: UX Live! Revitalizing the Customer Experience

Posted By Kayte Hamilton, Thursday, May 2, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, May 1, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: : UX Live! Revitalizing the Customer Experience

UX Live!

Summary:
At the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference Shaili Bhatt and Nancy Baum, both from C+R Research, gave all of us quallies a live, interactive demo of mobile usability testing. Through small group work on writing effective mobile User Experience (UX) questions and a Q/A session that had the room buzzing, we gained helpful practices to help us execute digital user experience sessions.

Key Takeaways:
I was thrilled to learn there are several easy-to-use applications that can be used to conduct digital usability testing on the market. While the available platforms range in pricing and features, many of them combine live video recordings, task based assignments, and real time updates that QRC’s can utilize to conduct more usability testing sessions nationwide while working remotely.

C+R Researcgh

Putting it into practice:
I am excited to utilize the tools we tested in session to conduct remote usability testing sessions!

A-ha moment:
Being able to see the live video with screen animation was a revelation. It really does replicate what you see in person, but allows you to be in more than one place at a time as a moderator

The presented platforms and hands on application in session was extremely useful for many of us in the room to understand the impact these platforms could have on our work. The question and answer session was lively, with many questions that sparked insightful conversations, it’s clear these tools are going to make a big impact on how many of us work!
 

Kayte HamiltonQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Kayte Hamilton
Issues & Answers Network, Inc.
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaytehamilton/

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative Research  user experience  UX 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: 20 lbs. of Potatoes in a 10 lb. bag; Managing Client Expectations

Posted By Peggy Moulton-Abbott, Thursday, April 25, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, April 23, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: 20 lbs. of Potatoes in a 10 lb. bag; Managing Client Expectations

Facts to Truth

Summary:
Kate Wagenlander Watson of KCW Global Research, LLC gave a super practical presentation at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference that provided strategies and hacks to manage overly-ambitious client demands. Throughout her presentation, she covered tactics and tips to help all QRC’s become savvy consultants at all points in the process from the first client call to the creation of the moderator guide and finally the actual execution of the groups for application across a wide variety of research objectives.

Key Takeaways:
Kate takes a realistic, but lighthearted approach to scenarios we can all relate to when clients continually over-stuff the study sack with more content than it can logically hold. With years of experience and an indefatigable spirit, Kate advises us to:

  1. Set the Foundation so clients' expectations are aligned with reality.  Do this starting with the proposal.  Protect both parties' interests by clearly stating how much of the client's goals/objectives can be accomplished within the methodology, time frame, and budget they're offering.  Offer alternatives, set boundaries and enforce them contractually (in writing).  And don't be afraid to say no and save yourself if it becomes obvious that no reasonable detente can be achieved.
  2. Manage the Stimuli and Guide Early and Often – continuously reinforce what is realistic within the amount of time available.  Kate provided strategies for shrinking/refining concepts, both in size and number.  She also demonstrated how to illustrate the time crunch in quantitative terms clients can understand, along with many other clever and insightful methods to manage scope-creep and over-stuffed guides.
  3. Controlling Potential Fieldwork Issues – before, during, and as groups are ending.

Offering the "nuclear option" – Kate demonstrates how just "giving clients what they ask for" can be the magic bullet to making them truly understand what they're demanding is unreasonable and unrealistic.

Putting it into practice:
I want to tattoo this presentation on the inside of our eyelids and implement it EVERY time we bid, field, and report a project!

A-ha moment:
Make your clients participate in a mock-session BEFORE fielding so they will see for themselves exactly how much content fits in a given time period. This way they really comprehend the limitations of the "time-space continuum"!

This presentation should be required-reading and standard practice for all QRC's, as well as clients. A first-timer from the client-side told this reporter that Kate's presentation was the most eye-opening of the entire conference!

Peggy Moulton-AbbottQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Peggy Moulton-Abbott
Newfound Insights
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/peggymaatnewfoundinsights/

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Superqualitative! Using Your Skills Beyond Marketing Research

Posted By Janet Standen, Thursday, April 18, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 3, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Superqualitative! Using Your Skills Beyond Marketing Research

SuperQualitative!

Foster Winter, who is Managing Director of Sigma Research Management Group presented stimulating ideas for opportunities to leverage typical qualitative skills into new arenas to all in attendance at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference. The presentation provided an opportunity for qualitative researchers to expand thinking into new and future directions. Winter’s presentation included video testimonials and interviews of professionals who are utilizing their qualitative skills in new careers including urban planning and training medical professionals. For those who are thinking about new directions for their business, the case studies and the ensuing discussion helped provide a dialog for expanding ones' current practice or developing a new business model. For those just starting out, he provided a broader platform for thinking about a business model.

Key Takeaways:
The core skills of great moderators have many different and diverse applications. Their usefulness abounds! From using them to help train doctors by acting as a patient dying of a disease, to moderating mommy and baby groups, to managing interactive community outreach sessions, to facilitating internal project team meetings, to interviewing interviewees for high level jobs, and more. The skills translate well to any environment where empathy, thinking on your feet, reacting quickly in the moment to evolve the conversation, and where interacting as a human who is staying on track while listening and empathizing with the audience is needed.

Putting it into practice:
I know, like many in attendance, I will be looking further into broader applications to apply my moderating skills.

A-ha moment:
There can be many audiences and target segments that can benefit from qualitative skills, it’s important to take the opportunity to explore how we all can expand our field and practice.

There's life after being a qualitative researcher, and many ways to enrich the diversity of projects as a qualitative researcher!

Judithe AndreQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Janet Standen

Scoot Insights
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/janetstanden/  
Twitter: @SCOOTInsights

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Go from Facts to Truth with Neuroscience and Storytelling

Posted By Judithe Andre, Thursday, April 11, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 3, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Go from Facts to Truth with Neuroscience and Storytelling

Facts to Truth

Summary:
There is no one thing more powerful than the power of a good story. 

Ask someone a direct question and they'll try to give you an honest answer. But have them tell you a story and jewels will emerge that will be surprisingly illuminating. Professional storyteller and CEO of Story Strategies Lisa Lipkin shared her storytelling experience at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference. Lipkin shared original storytelling techniques for extracting emotionally honest information in a safe and effective way and how to interpret those narrative responses.

Key Takeaways:
At the most basic level, humans are hardwired for stories because our brains thrive on wanting to know, “will this information help me survive?” When we share information, e.g., what we as moderators tell respondents or clients and what we hear in return, the information gets translated neurologically in ways that are undoubtedly powerful, although, not fully understood. We do know, however, the benefits of storytelling are multi-fold. Lipkin shared that storytelling promotes healing, increases dopamine and decreases stress levels. If we tell an emotionally-inducing story, not only are we the storytellers producing oxytocin, but so does the listener. Storytelling creates a neural coupling affect that results in greater connection and resonance between and/or among listeners.

Tips and tricks for delivering and eliciting stories:

  1. See the story in everything. Every object and person, even the most mundane of things has a story. We may have to stare at things for uncomfortably long periods of times, but staring long enough will reveal the story.
    Tip: Have respondents use the things and objects around them to tell their story.

  2. Fact is not the truth. Never start your presentation to a client by stating what the important facts are. Instead, consider what fascinates, compels and/or moves you the most, and start with that.  Due to neural coupling, if you are not engaged or moved by the story, nor will your audience be engaged.
    Tip: The key to compelling delivery is to start with the emotion and it can be a totally random emotion but make this the core story, then follow with the facts. Let the facts hang on the core or the emotionally punchy story for more impact.

  3. Know when your chapter is over. Be mindful of your audience and timing so that you know when your story has run its course. Listeners and audiences will know if the storyteller is not being authentic
    Tip: It is important to regularly recharge emotionally to ensure your storytelling stays effective.

     

Three specific techniques to help with eliciting stories from your participants: 

  1. Ask them where did they play as a kid?  Have them be very specific as they answer.
  2. Use objects. E.g., tell me the story about your accessory. Objects are vehicles that allow participants to not know that anything is being expected of them so that they can share deeper nuggets of truth.
  3. Use the invisible. For example, hand an imaginary box to your respondent and ask her to reach in and take out any object that was precious to her grandparents. Asking the participant to speak about her grandparents and not herself helps remove the direct association to the respondent; allowing her to be more honest. This approach almost always, and subconsciously, reveals what is ultimately truly meaningful to the respondent.

Remember: There is no one thing more powerful than the power of a good story. 

Putting it into practice:
I really enjoyed the session and appreciated Lipkin sharing her experience with all of us at the conference. I thought the elicitation tips were spot on and will incorporate them into practice.

A-ha moment:
We are all neurologically wired for a story, so let's start telling stories.

There’s no way to prepare for what we are going to hear, but as moderators we have to release some control and trust that these questions will go somewhere and lead to some very insightful information and jewels! 

Judithe AndreQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Judithe Andre
Verbal Clue Qualitative Research

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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