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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Keeping Austin Weird - Authentic Insight from Texas Creative

Posted By Laurie Bredenfoerder, BValley Communications, Thursday, March 12, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene:
Keeping Austin Weird - Authentic Insight from Texas Creative

Presenter: Daniel Berkal, The Palmerston Group

 QualPower Blog
Left to right) Professor Ryan Romero; #Texascreative students Rocio Santiago, Esther Shin, Cailyn Wesstrom, Joel Linkewer, Nick Gonzales, and presenter Daniel Berkal

Summary of Conference Session
A unique session at the 2020 QRCA Annual Conference was the “Keeping Austin Weird - Authentic Insight from Texas Creative” panel presentation led by Daniel Berkal.

Art directors and copywriters-to-be enrolled in the #Texas Creative program at UT-Austin share big-picture insights they've gained while completing class assignments. For those QRCs that work in communications, these people will become future clients. But the world has rapidly changed. Different tools are available. The age of creative-test focus groups may be over! The panel focused on questions like “What are the people looking for in their qualitative research?”, “What kinds of methodologies and approaches are most valuable to them?”, and  “What are the needs of the modern creative industry?”

Key Session Takeaways
Personally, I had so many takeaways from this presentation. Gaining this kind of insight was absolutely invaluable to my work. A few highlights from the discussion are:

  • That we, as qualitative professionals, need to "look for the human truth", "use insights to describe how people do things or how things actually function”, and “be out where the people are".
  • To deal with challenges to your creative idea:
    • "I try to think through what the rationale behind the idea is."
    • "There's always water in the well and we need to keep coming back to it."
  • What does the creative process look like for you?
    • "At the beginning, you try to get the 'walls' out of the way. The human truths blow through any personal bias."
    • "Being a great communicator is saying things very simply and clearly."
  • How do you know when a creative idea is good?
    • "People laugh."
    •  "They nod their heads."
    • "Good ideas bring more ideas. Bad ideas stop the conversation."

Aha Moment
Advice from the students' professor, Ryan Romero, on how to accept criticism: "If five people tell you you're drunk, you probably should sit down on the curb."

Final Comments
Try to look out beyond the process and focus on keeping research human. Dan Berkal brought students and QRCA members in a room without giving either group any explanation of what was "supposed to happen" or "why."  It did, and we gained from it. Thanks, Dan and #Texas Creative!"

 

Laurie BredenfoerderQRCA Reporter on the Scene:
Laurie Bredenfoerder, BValley Communications

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative  Qualitative Careers  Texas Creative 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Wise Ways to Go Forward with Humanity

Posted By Arilene Hernandez, Independent Consultant/Behavioral Health Clinician, Thursday, March 5, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene:
Wise Ways to Go Forward with Humanity

Presenter: Naomi Henderson, RIVA Market Research & Training Institute

 QualPower Blog

Summary of Conference Session
The 2020 QRCA Annual Conference gave all who attended the chance to hear from a plethora of talented and respected speakers, including a bonus keynote, the qualitative superstar herself, Naomi Henderson!

During her closing keynote presentation, “Wise Ways to Go Forward with Humanity”, Naomi gave a look into the story of her birth, a foreshadowing of the uniqueness she was to embody for the rest of her life. This uniqueness bleeds into her work today and led her down the path of training researchers in the art and science of rigorous qualitative research techniques. During her presentation Naomi identified for the audience the four qualities that distinguish qualitative researchers. The main one being that “we are inspired to use those things that make us human to be the translators for those who are deaf to the voice of the consumer.”

Aha Moment
Naomi’s metaphor of how the back of the hand and the palm of the hand represents quant and qual research, respectively, was a fascinating take on how the two worlds of research interact and how qualitative research is so important for clients to understand their consumers.

Final Comments
Naomi’s presentation was a reminder that being human and connecting with other humans is what facilitates great qual research. She inspired the audience to continue to be creative, passionate and embrace humor.

 

Arilene HernandezQRCA Reporter on the Scene:
Arilene Hernandez, Independent Consultant/Behavioral Health Clinician

Tags:  Humanizing Research  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative  Qualitative Research  Quantitative 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Rise of the Robots, Chatbots, Humans!

Posted By Gayle Moberg, Thursday, February 27, 2020
Updated: Thursday, February 27, 2020

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Rise of the Robots, Chatbots, Humans!

Presenter: Kristin Luck, ScaleHouse and Women in Research (WIRe)

Summary

As the opening keynote speaker of the 2020 QRCA Annual Conference where the theme was “Keep Qual Human”, many in attendance were excited to hear how we can marry advances in technology with our qualitative practices and instincts.  Throughout the session, Kristin focused on what we've done right as researchers and more importantly, what we can do better as our industry continues to change and grow.

Above all, Kristin highlighted that we need to be researchers (not just quallies); observers, not just questioners; consultants/synthesizers, not just analysts; storytellers, not just fact reporters; we need to engage with our respondents as humans, not robots. 

Key Session Takeaways

I had so many takeaways from Kristin’s keynote talk the first being that we should all identify as "Researchers," not "Qual" or "Quant." We need to continue to grow our practice which means avoiding older labels and instead focusing on what we all do, research.

Another impactful takeaway from Kristin’s session was that the market research industry is bigger than cloud services, coffee, and digital music. As Kristin put it, "data is the new oil." This of course now means that “traditional" research is now threatened by falling between clients' faster/lower-cost DIY research and consulting firms' ability to move from [tactical] data collection to [strategic] holistic, synthesized recommendations, which resonate with C-suites. Since the C-suite has changed, we must to as researchers. It’s time to become Data Translator/Synthesizers, not just Data Collector/Analyzers and put on our "Research Mullets", Business in front, Party in the back!

Aha Moment

Kristin’s quote: "Data is the new oil” was EYE-OPENING! That's a BIG deal, it really conveys the value of what we do and offer.

Final Comments and Takeaways

We must stop pigeon-holing ourselves as Qual researchers! It’s time to think of ourselves as researchers, storytellers, synthesizers, observers, strategists who engage respondents as HUMANS on their terms, not ours. Let's all go forward to work as humans above all else!

QRCA Reporter on the Scene: Gayle Moberg, GDM Marketing Solutions

 

 

Tags:  Kristin Luck  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Autoethnography: Real Human Real Quick

Posted By Amye Parker, Thursday, February 20, 2020

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Autoethnography: Real Human Real Quick

Presenters: Jenny Karubian, Ready to Launch ResearchScott Koenig, MRXology

Summary

Jenny and Scott’s session was delivered to a packed room at the 2020 QRCA Annual Conference, starting with a warm welcome and quick poll: nearly everyone present currently conducts ethnographies, but only a handful of audience members were familiar with autoethnography. Which sparked an obvious need for a definition.

Autoethnography allows the research participant to also be the researcher, by describing and evaluating cultural experiences, analyzing their stories and engaging with the meaning and emotion in their experiences. Journaling is an oft-used qualitative method and, while like autoethnography, Jenny and Scott highlighted the key differences between the two methods.

They described journaling as more about recording, while autoethnography is about reflection; journaling often captures daily activities, behavioral patterns and functional responses, while autoethnography yields results about the broader cultural context and responses may draw from a longer period of time (e.g. reflecting back to childhood). Another key difference is autoethnography’s encouragement for participants to draw commonalities and conclusions from the other participants involved in the study.

Key Session Takeaways

The topic of autoethnography drew a large crowd of people with little to no experience with the method, indicating a strong interest among researchers to continually evolve our toolbox as researchers. Jenny and Scott did a great job bringing the method to life through their case study, and I especially liked the example autoethnography questions. Their practical checklists and comparison tables demonstrated how elements of autoethnography could easily be applied to the online qualitative research that many quallies are already conducting.

Aha Moment

During the session, Jenny and Scott brought autoethnography to life through sharing the results of a recent case study. Seeing autoethnography in action helped highlight how I could utilize this tool in my own practice! This was especially evident when we saw the results of a comparison in journaling responses and autoethnography responses, with autoethnography participants providing more emotion, nostalgia, and long-form answers to the online questions. 

Final Comments and Takeaways

The session ended with a lengthy Q&A session, with at least 15 different questions being asked by the audience…the sign of a truly engaging presentation! Key discussions were about recruitment and what screener questions were needed to ensure autoethnography participants had quality writing skills and the ability to reflect/draw meaningful insights from their own stories. Thank you, Scott and Jenny, for an informative session!

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene: Amye Parker, Jackman Reinvents

 

Tags:  ethnography  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Research Methodologies 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: UX Research is not a Synonym for Usability Testing

Posted By Rachel Wang, Thursday, February 13, 2020

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: UX Research is not a Synonym for Usability Testing

Presenter: Kristine Remer, JuneUX

Summary

At the QRCA 2020 Annual Conference, Kristine Remer started her presentation “UX Research is not a Synonym for Usability Testing” with a bold declaration, that she is not afraid of dancing in public and she used that throughout her presentation.

Dancing aside, throughout her presentation Kristine shared her gold mine of knowledge about the UX research world. She reminded all in attendance that UX research is not a synonym for usability testing. The headline of the presentation may be an “I-cannot-agree-more” truth for savvy UX researchers and designers, but an unknown land to explore for others.  Kristine unveils this myth with her 3-part sharing- what is UX research, where UX researchers work, and how do UX researchers work. With each step, she lured the audience into the heart of the UX research world.

At the end of her presentation, Kristine encouraged the audience to further dive into the UX design world by joining the design twitter, mentor UX researchers, and exploring additional UX resources from a recent blog post.

Key Session Takeaways

So, what are my key takeaways from this fabulous session?

WHAT IS UX RESEARCH?

  1. First of all, UX stands for user experience.
  2. User experience is a broad field. This is because the USER is human, and humans have a vast range of experiences. Think of things like eating, drinking, sleeping, grooming, dressing, commuting, working, entertaining, socializing, reading, teaching, health-caring, dating, lovemaking, parenting, shopping, traveling and beyond.
  3. The research of the UX is to facilitate the design of the products or services related to the human experience. Some examples include to design a salsa holder/bottle, a webpage, an application, a museum, or the airline service system that makes sense to the users.
  4. UX research uses a ton of methodologies which are listed and explained on Kristine’s website.

WHERE UX RESEARCHERS WORK

UX researchers work in a vast range of places related to the design and innovation of the product or service, including innovation labs, on product, service or CX teams and in Centers of Excellence.

HOW UX RESEARCHERS WORK

The delivery is not in word-intensive reports, but the visually-juicy MAPS. To name a few, the Empathy Map, Task Analysis Grid, Storyboard, Story Map and Service Blueprint.

Aha Moment

Kristine Remer has great moves for dancing as well as for UX Research Methodology. She has collected and summarized a whole page of the UX research methodology!

Final Comments and Takeaways

With all the different words and systems of methodology, UX Research and Qualitative Research have the same goal of creating positive social impact through deeper understanding and effectively sharing the Human Truth. Set no limit for your approaches, folks.

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene: Rachel Wang, LTH Business Consulting

 

 

Tags:  data  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  UX 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits

Posted By Anya Zadrozny, Thursday, June 13, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits

Kayte Hamilton’s session Bid Adieu to Bad Proposal Habits focused on the current trends in proposal writing. As the co-chair of the QRCA Qually Award (which is an award given to the researcher that submits the best proposal to a set RFP) Kayte has had the unique experience of peaking behind the curtain and checking out what today’s proposals look like. With that knowledge along with interviews she conducted with fellow researchers, she took attendees through ways they could update and refresh their proposal writing, content and presentation to win more business.

Before we get to the meaty slide – here are two tips to remember before you start creating your proposal.

  1. View your proposal as the first expression of your company and brand identity. Make sure your brand personality and style shine through.
  2. When you receive an RFP, ask questions to the potential client about the target audience, budget, timing to return proposal, etc. Worst case – you don’t get a response, best case – you form a connection with the potential client and stand out from the crowd.
  3. Get feedback. Set reminders when you send in proposals to send a follow-up e-mail in a week to check the status of the proposal. Set another Email reminder to get feedback on why you did or did not get the job. Remember to use that proposal feedback to update your next proposal.

Here are five main trends from Kayte’s presentation that are helpful for you to know, and research further, as you go forth and submit proposals.

  • Brevity
    • The trending length of your proposal should be around 8 pages or slides. That’s 1 cover + 7 supporting pages and it should be sent in PDF format.
    • Be aware and find a balance between articulation and over-explanation.
    • As moderators we are great at mirroring and use it to our advantage, however - mirroring is not helpful here – don’t waste space copying proposal wording or creating a long run up to your design – the clients know what they asked. Answer the question, don’t pose it again.
    • The KISS method – aka keep it simple stupid – is the best way to present your ideas. Clients are often opening proposals on their phones or checking out proposals during small breaks during the day. Present them with something they are not going to dread or be intimidated to read.
  • Design
    • Your proposal should be presented in a visually appealing way, it should add to the streamlined, clean feeling of the content.
    • How do you get to design? After digesting the RFP, start with an outline of what you want to cover, then get into the heavy, meaty writing, then edit and trim that brain dump to get the executive summary level of the content, and finally add that text into your design.
    • Don’t have a proposal template? Piggyback off of your report template, or search for free proposal designs in Google with a few keywords and go from there. Don’t discount hiring a professional here. This is often the first impression of your brand.
    • Terrified of going from word to PPT? Try turning your word page from portrait to landscape and give that a try.
  • Multi-Phase Research
    • This is more of a research trend than a proposal style trend – but Kayte found that multi-phase research is in! If this isn’t something you are already doing, she suggested a few ways to implement multi-phase research, without it being a giant undertaking.
      • Integrate the pre-research you are already doing as the first phase into your proposal.
      • Utilize the same respondents or a select few respondents from part one into part 2 to save on recruiting costs. For example, a mobile board to focus groups.
  • Collaboration
    • We are facilitators, we juggle various stakeholders and agendas. Why not officially involve these stakeholders in your research phases? From a debrief session at the end, to a mini working session or co-creation session between phase 1 and phase 2 or a facilitated findings co-creation exercise before report writing - getting stakeholder involvement and awareness during the whole research process can be time-saving and beneficial.
    • Adding research phases where your client can observe the participant in the real world was also suggested.
  • Social
    • Using Social media is trending.
    • Monitoring and scanning online reviews, videos, comments and forums to assess the topic.
    • Using social media research as the first phase or pre-research information as pre-research and a dose of reality.
    • Check what awareness there is from your client of their customers opinions of their brand via their social media presence.

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Anya Zadrozny

AnyaZMedia

Twitter: @Anyazmedia

 

Tags:  proposals  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data

Posted By Randi Stillman, Thursday, June 6, 2019
Updated: Monday, June 3, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data

UX Live!

Summary:
At the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Caroline Volpe, Compass Market Research LLC and Maria Virobik, ResearchScribe, presented on the “Many Ways to Tell a Story: Exploring Different Approaches to Displaying Data”. Through their hands-on presentation, the presenting team shared inspiration, ideas, and tools to communicate research data in text-based reports by the creative use of visual elements to tell a story with all in attendance.

Key Takeaways:
QRCs can apply a few simple guidelines and have access to free or low-cost online tools if they want to transform the bulleted text of a traditional PPT report into a visually compelling story. The presenters recommend creating a desktop inspiration folder to save icons, vector graphics (for infographics), images, and report formats, such as the methodology section for depicting the who, what, when, where, and how of your project. Don't forget to use built-in visual design elements, such as size, color, spacing, etc. for clarity, direction, and importance when you put your report together to tell a story. Some of the resources mentioned include: The Noun Project, Flat Icon, Free Pick, CanStockPhoto, 123RF, Slideshop, SmartArt, and Inkscape.

Putting it into practice:
I will continue to think visually as a storyteller when doing my own reports and I'll explore some of the resources mentioned for inspiration and new ideas. 

A-ha moment:
For best results, allow yourself some time to explore and be playful when getting ideas and searching images that will help you tell a compelling story.

Kayte HamiltonQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Randi Stillman
Bottom Line Market Research & Consulting
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/randistillman/
Twitter: @bottomlinemrv

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Opening Closed Doors with Role Play

Posted By Vidhika Bansal, Thursday, May 30, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 20, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Opening Closed Doors with Role Play

Summary:

Although immersive ethnographic research is the gold standard for gathering real-world insights, there are situations when financial, regulatory, logistical, privacy, and ethical constraints make such contextual research extremely challenging, if not altogether unfeasible. Luckily, as Elizabeth George shared with attendees at the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, role play is a fantastic alternative research method that can allow us to learn a lot about the nuanced conversations that occur “behind closed doors”.

By pairing a respondent immersed in a scenario with an actor who engages with the respondent to simulate a real-world situation, we can begin to better understand the natural language used and interactions characteristic of dialogue around a given product or topic. We can also gain deeper insight into the dynamics of complex decision-making, such as how potential customers may react to two different sales pitches. These insights are especially helpful in developing messaging strategy, educational content that addresses gaps in awareness, as well as gauging receptiveness to specific ideas or approaches.

 

Key Takeaways:

  • When to use it: Role play research can be especially helpful when attempting to glean nuanced information from stakeholders in industries that are highly-regulated, prohibitively-costly, or ethically-challenging.
  • The process: There are several steps to the process of conducting role play research, namely: identifying the research objectives and scenario of interest, determining appropriate roles and recruiting actors for them, creating profiles and guidance for your actors and respondents, “setting the scene” for respondents and observing interactions play out, and finally debriefing both parties.
  • Valuable outcomes: Content and messaging strategy development is often a key outcome of such research, along with a better understanding of receptiveness (or lack thereof) to certain products or approaches.

 

Putting it into practice:

The next time I work with a client in the financial or healthcare space or am struggling to get “behind a closed door” of any sort for immersive research, I will keep this invaluable tool in my back pocket as a high-quality alternative approach.

 

A-ha moments:

  • Especially in salesperson-prospect and physician-patient scenarios, respondents often are able to act relatively natural despite being in a simulated setting with an actor because they tend to be accustomed to using role play when they are first being trained.
  • Using the physical space to your advantage, by walking the respondent over to the actor (and conducting setup and debriefs in a different space), can help limit the influence of the environment being simulated vs. real for the respondent.
  • Role play research can be a fantastic way to validate personas that you have already created, especially if they were proto-personas largely based on assumptions.

Liz was an absolutely fantastic presenter—engaging, knowledgeable, and able to explain her process in digestible and relatable terms—and this research method is a great one to add to our expanding toolkit.

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Vidhika Bansal

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vidhikabansal/

Twitter: @Vidhster

 

Tags:  qrca  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research  Research Methodologies 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Neuroscience of Memorable Messages

Posted By Graciela Braniff, Thursday, May 23, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 13, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Neuroscience of Memorable Messages

Summary:

Dr. Carmen Simon presented during the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference on strategies for transforming yourself and your message into something worth noticing and remembering. According to Dr. Simon, one of the biggest problems with business content is that audiences forget 90% of what you share after two days. To help us understand how people pay attention, remember content, and ultimately act on it, we need to look at the field of neuroscience, which reveals insights on how the brain processes information and tends to remember it – or, more often – forget it.  Throughout her session, Dr. Simon taught us how to convert neuroscience insights into practical guidelines you can use to craft content with lasting impact. This is critical because both your internal and external audiences make decisions in your favor based on what they remember, not on what they forget.

 

Key Takeaways:

This was the most interesting presentation regarding neuroscience that I have heard in a long time. Instead of a explaining how neuroscience can help to analyze concepts and advertising and discover how emotionally interesting or engaging they are (which from what I have read is not possible) Dr. Simon explained what can help make our presentations and our reports more memorable in our spectators’ minds.

One remembers only maybe 10% of what is presented. So, it is extremely important that there is one main idea that unifies the whole presentation. It must be clear, and it has to convey a reward to the spectator. This idea must engage on mental models (existing associations) that the spectator knows because this helps them perceive it rapidly. In the presentation there has to be a balance between what is new and what is a mental model, so twist the familiar with what is new to consolidate memorability. These ideas can also be applied to the messages that our clients want to convey

 

Putting it into practice:

After hearing Dr. Simon’s presentation, I took the opportunity to renew my company's presentation and reports I had done to help them be more memorable!

 

A-ha moment:

There was a moment during the presentation that I realized how much something Dr. Simon presented resonated: “An idea that moves and motivates me thoroughly, will also move and motivate others.” It seems simple, but it really stuck with me. I even used the presentation information to redo two important upcoming presentations based on this information.

 

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Graciela Braniff

Braniff Qualitative

 

 

 

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  Qualitative Research 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Better AND Faster? It can be Done!

Posted By Peggy Moulton-Abbott, Thursday, May 16, 2019
Updated: Monday, May 13, 2019

Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Better AND Faster? It can be Done!

Summary:

In the dynamic, fast-paced environment in which we all operate, innovation is crucial. During the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Allison Rak of Vatoca Partners presented practical methods to take our businesses and offerings to the next level. Allison gave us Quallies so many methods to lighten our work loads and speed up our outputs including a method for report writing that will literally cut days off of your turnaround time, while taking your deliverables up a notch!

Key Takeaways:

Follow these steps:

  1. List everything you do in the course of your work.
  2. Identify tasks you love.
  3. Identify tasks ONLY you can do.
  4. Find someone to whom you can outsource everything else.
  5. Build the costs into your overall budget and do not break it out to the client.

There are many great, efficient and inexpensive resources are available to help us with our work, we need to tap into these resources!

 

Putting it into practice:

It’s a great self-examination exercise to identify everything we’re doing and concentrate on outsourcing the time/labor intensive tasks we could pay someone else to do so we can concentrate on what we love to do.

A-ha moment:

There are so many sites and apps that can provide qualified people to do our drudge work and even assist our clients with theirs. Everyone should look and listen to this sage advice!

QRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Peggy Moulton-Abbott

Newfound Insights

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/peggymaatnewfoundinsights/

 

 

Tags:  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research 

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