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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Catch and Release

Posted By Melanie Brewer, Friday, February 22, 2019
Updated: Friday, February 15, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: Catch and Release

Recruit 2.0:  Online Marketplaces

Summary:
Do you want to save time and money on recruiting?  So do I.  That’s why I was really excited for the presentation “Catch & Release: Applying My Experience Learning to Fly Fish to Using New Recruiting Tools and Services” by Ted Kendall of TripleScoop Premium Market Research. New platforms for recruiting respondents are disrupting the marketplace, similar to the ways that Uber and Airbnb disrupted the car services and hotel marketplaces. These platforms put the power into our hands, but as Ted put it, how do you decide whether these new platforms fit your recruiting needs and if they do, how do you adapt all your recruiting skills to the new medium?

Key Takeaways:
While acknowledging that no system is perfect, Ted extolled some of the advantages (big) and challenges (modest) based on his several years of experience with Respondent.io and Userinterviews.com, two platforms that are making it possible to easily recruit for qual studies – sometimes filling a study within just a few short hours and at a significantly lower cost.  Benefits include the ability to authenticate users via LinkedIn or Facebook profiles, 80% or higher show rates, easy screening, and access to diverse groups, professions and geographic locations.  While there can be a learning curve, Ted argues it's well worth it for the benefits.  In addition, the platforms are rapidly evolving and are likely to just keep getting better.  Each offers unique features, so they're both worth trying.  One twist is the need to "market" or "pitch" your study to participants, so be prepared to make your project sound awesome and exciting to motivate them to respond – but ideally without totally giving away your screening criteria.

Putting it into practice:
I plan on exploring the tools Ted presented, along with the new features that are being rolled out on a regular basis, after the conference.

A-ha moment:
The observation that these platforms are disintermediating the marketplace similar to other software tools like Uber and Airbnb, and – just like those tools – are likely to become an increasingly important part of the landscape going forward – meaning we should all learn to use them so we don’t get left behind.

I will leave you with this final pro-tip courtesy of Ted: you can use the tipping feature in Respondent to pay for extra tasks you may wish the participants to complete, like homework or pre- or post-tasks!  

Melanie BrewerQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Melanie Brewer
Santa Barbara Human Factors, Inc.
Twitter: @melanieinsb
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melaniebennettbrewer/  

Tags:  Conference Recap  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene  qualitative research  Recruiting 

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Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Hidden Forces that Shape our Decisions

Posted By Heather Coda, Thursday, February 14, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Annual Conference Reporter on the Scene: The Hidden Forces that Shape our Decisions

QualPower Blog

Summary:
At the 2019 QRCA Annual Conference, Colleen Welsh-Allen of Kantar Health provided a practical guide to behavioral science, the heuristics that most affect market research, and some clear cut ways to conduct better research with an understanding of these concepts. Behavioral science teaches us that humans are non-rational decision makers who make nearly all their decisions by using mental shortcuts (or "rules of thumb") called heuristics. As researchers we need to take these heuristics into account with our guide writing, moderating, analysis and reporting to uncover real motivations, feelings, and perceptions, and help our clients grasp them. Ultimately, to counsel our clients on how to change behavior, we need to understand behavior better.

Key Takeaways:
Heuristics drive "System 1" thinking which is automatic, effortless, and top of mind. To survive, humans rely on System 1 thinking the majority of the time.  "System 2" thinking is slow, deliberate, logical and calculating, and is used when we are learning something new. Since we as humans use both types of thinking in our lives, our research should incorporate techniques that use both systems of thinking, such as mind maps, blob tree, photo sorts, rapid fire questioning, and narrative and cognitive interviewing.

Putting it into practice:
Colleen shared practical implications of some of the many heuristics people use. Some of the best examples are as follows:

  1. LOSS AVERSION: People are more focused on avoiding loss than gaining, so consider both what respondents, as well as your clients, are concerned about losing
  2. PEAK END RULE: People assess experiences based on how they were at their peak (whether pleasant or unpleasant) and how they ended so be sure to capture their sentiments at these junctures
  3. EGO: Maintaining "face" is a predominant human need which leads people to misstate actual behavior. Thus if capturing behavior is important to study objectives, find methodologies that allow you to see behavior rather than hear about reported behavior.

A-ha moment:
Some of the heuristics provide the scientific explanation to confirm what we already know to be good research practices such as the following:

  1. Word questions as neutrally as possible to avoid bias (FRAMING heuristic);
  2. Ask those questions first that require respondents not be primed. Also, be aware of anything in your appearance or demeanor, or facility surroundings that may bias the respondent (PRIMING heuristic);
  3. Capture top of mind, "gut" reactions to concepts and ads before delving deeper, and take note of body language (AFFECT heuristic). 

Colleen's presentation not only satisfies intellectual curiosity about behavioral science but also provides the rationale behind some important research practices. It introduces new tools and techniques that many researchers may not be aware of to improve the value of research, in terms of both how defend the reasons for techniques to clients, and through the results themselves.

Heather CodaQRCA Reporter on the Scene:

Heather Coda
HMC Marketing Research
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/heather-coda-b054088/

Tags:  Conference Recap  QRCA Annual Conference  QRCA Reporter on the Scene 

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Change is the New Normal: Insights from the 2018 QRCA Conference

Posted By Kathleen Doyle, Doyle Research Associates, Inc, Thursday, February 8, 2018

If you are a qualitative researcher and have not attended a QRCA Conference, you owe it to yourself to add it to your list. QRCA members are hands-down the most generous, forward-thinking and collegial people you will ever meet, and the conference itself is unlike any other.

As usual, this year’s conference was full of educational and inspirational sessions, great exhibitors, and some excellent and thought-provoking roundtable discussions.

Here is a recap of my key takeaways:

  1. Social media and AI technology are rapidly becoming the next generation tool for qualitative recruiting and data collection. Shapiro & Raj discussed their social adaptive recruiting, which accesses forums, online communities, and public social networks to “find the hard-to-find”; and Tory Gentes discussed some decidedly non-traditional techniques for using tools in our socially connected world (some sites this Boomer had never heard of before!) as a means to find quality recruits.
  2. Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are poised to explode as a qualitative tool. David Bauer, of Hemisphere Insights, led a great session on this topic. As home VR equipment becomes ubiquitous, and programming costs are reduced, the ability to create more engaging experiences will become a reality. Use VR/AR to test concepts in-home; to simulate an in-store shopping experience; to create truly engaging virtual ethnography; to facilitate co-creation; and to allow stakeholders to understand the customer experience in a way not possible before.
  3. The traditional qualitative report is slowly but surely going the way of the dinosaur. The momentum continues to grow for shorter, more visual, non-traditional reports that tell a story that can persuade and influence decision making. While PPT is still most common, reports may also take the form of podcasts, photo books, full video reports, magazine reports, talk shows, or any number of other creative deliverables.
  4. The line between qualitative and quantitative is continuing to blur. Any survey can now be combined with qualitative feedback via video open-ends or qualitative “pull outs” — where a select number of respondents (based on their survey responses) are asked to participate in follow up qualitative interviews, to expand upon the learning from the survey and address the “why’s” behind their responses. Where once qualitative and quantitative were distinctly different beasts, hybrid projects are becoming increasingly common.

It’s an exciting time to be in the market research industry. Hold on, and enjoy the ride!

“This is a new year. A new beginning. And things will change.”

― Taylor Swift

“The pace of change and the threat of disruption creates tremendous opportunities…”

― Steve Case

Sign up today for the 2019 QRCA conference.

Tags:  conference recap  QRCA  QRCA Annual Conference  qualitative market research  qualitative research 

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